Monday, September 16, 2013

A Letter From The Cows To Chipotle

Dear Chipotle,

I was deeply disappointed after watching your Scarecrow video that misrepresented modern agriculture practices. Pandering a 1984-esque post dystopian nightmare of farming to the ill informed is not how food should be marketed. Of all the gross misconceptions shown in the video the ones of dairy cows offended me, a cow, the most. I have never been in a metal box and unable to move. Honey, if you even think you could get me in one I'd like to see you try! 



As far as cows riding on conveyor belts that is not a nightmare that is a dream.  I can imagine The Farmer having conveyors we could take from the barn to the pasture or even a green field for us to graze on. I also don't think you thought out the conclusion to your scifi story. The scarecrow, being the good capitalist that he is, starts a small business. As it grows, perhaps as Chipotle itself has grown, he will use new methods that maintain sustainability in order to meet his demand. Others might view these as industrial practices and vilify him as only replacing those he sought to stop in the first place. Welcome to my world! 

Some might view me, even as only one of a hundred cows, as being on a "factory farm" as described in the video. The truth is that we cows need the same amount of care no matter the scale of the farming operation. If I am well cared for then I will be productive. This is the first truth every farmer must learn. Cows, and animals in general, that are treated the way those in the video proposes could not exist on a real farm. That must be why you made a cartoon!

What is disturbing is how you are marketing your food by putting down modern agriculture and making it look evil. Farmers have innovated with new ideas like many other businesses. You don't expect a banker to continue using a paper ledger to compute figures, do you? Then neither should you expect farmers to remain stagnant. Research by companies, universities, and extension have not only allowed farmers to be more productive, they have also allowed farmers to provide better care of their animals (very important to me!), and be more environmentally friendly so they can continue to pass their farm to the next generation. That's sustainability!

The market is actually big enough for farms of all sizes and production practices. There is no reason to denigrate one over the other. Our milk is marketed as wholesome and nutritious and it just tastes delicious, even if i do say so myself. That's how you do it! If you have a better product then tell it and sell it, but please don't misrepresent everyone else in order to make a profit.

Sincerely,

Agent 101 from the Udder Side.

P.S. I think more dairy in your menu is a great way to improve sales. Cheese is always a winner!

P.P.S. I had to continue my thoughts on Chipotle and factory farms here.

65 comments:

  1. Bravo! Tahnk you for getting the truth out so that others can see that Chipotle is doing not only a disservice to themselves but also to the countless numbers of farmers that are taking care of the livestock.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We're here to spread truth with a healthy dose of common sense!

      Delete
  2. Well said! Thank you for sharing the TRUTH!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are welcome. Thank you for reading and sharing!
      -Agent 101

      Delete
  3. Way to go, Agent 101! It's time that folks heard TRUTH. And heard it straight from the COW's perspective. lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for reading. We cows sometimes have more to chew on than our cud and we just have to voice our opinions.

      -Agent 101

      Delete
  4. Yea but how do you argue the images of chickens and cows being pumped full of chemical which are most likely representing growth hormones and substances of concern for many?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In the U.S. injectable hormones in all animal agriculture are extremely regulated. Most growth hormones that are used are also naturally accuring in that animals body. We as "man" just are able to synthesise hormones on a much larger scale and be able to utilise them in a productive manner. For instance RBST recombinant bovine somata tropin is really mass produced by humans but are naturally accuring growth hormone found in cattle also known as BST (bovine somata tropin). Neither RBST or BST will react with the human receptor for our naturally occurring somata tropin (growth hormone) they are to different to react with each other. The claim that the estrogen levels found in milk are causing children to go in to puberty faster is another false claim. My dairy science professor in college once said that there is more estrogen in a human females breath when she is on her period or estrus cycle then in TEN (10) gallons of milk. A big reason for young females going through puberty earlier has a lot to do with the diet that they are on.
      From a future Agricultural Educator

      Delete
    2. One of the things I think many people forget in the equation is that farmers are consumers, too. Farmers don't raise everything for their own family; they go to the grocery store and buy things, they go to out to eat. The idea of watching their children eat food "pumped full of chemicals" is ghastly, too, but animals raised that way are like in the Chipotle video, in only a world of imagination.

      Did you know that a milk sample is taken at every farm at every milk pick up and checked for antibiotics? Cows sold for beef are randomly sampled for residues as well. Farmers found guilty of violations of either are punished.

      Delete
    3. To make a point about chickens: hormones are not used on chickens. They have not found a way to utilize them in any way that would be useful or beneficial. Meat chickens may look like they are fed hormones because when they grow up they look like they swallowed a bowling ball, but that's just what they look like. You can prove this to yourself by buying a Cornish White Rock cross (the most common meat chicken) for about $1 at a Farm and Fleet or other store. Feed it whatever you want, I promise it will still grow up to look like it swallowed a bowling ball.

      And a note on hormones: the most common way dairy farmers use hormones is to put their cows on a synchronized heat cycle. Basically, we give them birth control. I promise it is very much the same process as when a woman takes the pill. The thing is, can you imagine giving a cow a pill a day?? Nope! Just like in humans, the same result can be reached through a less frequent injection. No juicing, just making sure the ladies are cycling at the same time so we can breed them to have babies during the best time of year.

      Delete
    4. Please answer this then - Why, when people attempting to lose weight, they remove the red meat from their daily eating habits, including removing dairy, do they drop an enormous amount of weight & fast? There are studies out there that show & have been proven the consumption of red meats, unless organic with no GMO's, are a factor in our countries obesity rates. Of course there are other things causing obesity, but when someone completely cuts their red meats out of their diet, after one failed diet after another, please answer how, after they cut those red meats, they finally lost the needed weight?

      Even when a cow is being milked - surely they're not comfortable being confined with big bars around their necks.

      Delete
    5. In my experience, with my own dieting, with my own friends that have dieted, with my background in nutrition, etc., you can take any one food group and eliminate it from your diet, and you're likely to lose weight. I'm certain there are plenty of studies that say if you eliminate sugar or carbs or greens or ice cream, etc. you will lose weight. Most people when they decide to eliminate a certain food group, it's typically the one food they overconsume! The factor of weight loss is simple: calories in must be less than calories out. If one is overconsuming calories - from any source, they will gain weight. If they do not create a negative energy balance, they will not lose weight. I gave up carbs and ate nothing but protein for 6 weeks - and lost a TON of weight. Look at the Atkins diet - it survives on meat and dairy! and there are 1000s of people that have lost weight on that plan.

      As to your belief that it must be organic and non-GMO....that's a completely different topic. First of all beef and dairy products are inherently non-GMO! the only GMO products you would consume come from plants. The belief that what we give our cattle can effect humans - is absolute true. HOWEVER!!!! That is why before any product is given to animals meant for human consumption, it goes through rigorous testing. There are safe guards. There are standards. Have there been violations - yes. Is the system 10000% perfect and fool proof - no....what is?

      In my opinion, the increase in obesity rates in our society have more to do with conveniences - convenient high fat food, drive thrus, convenience stores selling high sugar foods and drinks, elevators, escalators, all of those things that we can't 'live' without are actually what is killing us.

      Delete
  5. Ok. But I see that you only raise 100 cows. You probably DO allow cows access to pasture land instead of just using a feedlot. Chipotle is exaggerating, but it's not as is a cow on a farm with several thousand head is living the good life either.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That brings up a good point. Should people leave big cities like NYC because of overcrowding? Is there not enough space there? What is the right environment? What is being "nice" to animals?

      A friend of The Farmer's gave this example one time: I keep my dog outside, unchained, with water, feed, a nice doghouse, shade, and places to roam. Your dog wears clothes, stays inside the house, and you take him with you in the car and on trips. These are totally different lifestyles. Are either mistreated? Which is best?

      This goes back to the point I made about animal care. If animals are abused or not given proper care then they will not be productive. Having productive animals is the only thing that makes a working farm profitable. If the animals are not cared for and become unproductive (less milk) then the farm will fail and go out of business. Just because it is different than how farms were in the 50's doesn't make it bad.

      Delete
    2. Thank you for sharing the truth about dairy farming and agriculture! I like your dog example. There is more than one way to properly care for cows, pigs, chickens and dogs. Humans don't live in a one-size-fits-all society and animals shouldn't either!

      Delete
    3. Ryan made some excellent points! If you travel to a farm who raises cows in a freestall barn as opposed to pasture you will see sand beds for them to lay down on, fans and probably sprinklers for when it's hot, large open walls to let a breeze through, and bunks of hay to much on. It's not a dark dank concrete building with no windows. The best part is, if you don't want to take my word for it you can go see for yourself! I know farmers who are always happy to give tours or there are organizations who schedule tours of farms, usually during the summer.

      Delete
    4. I challenge anyone saying that BIG farms keeping cows inside is detremental to the animals.If you were a 1600 lb animal would u rather be laying in a pasture under the scorching sun..........or in a barn......with rubber mats on the floor........sand in the stalls.......and several fans blowing on you? There lives are like walking around in crocks and lying on the beach. I also notice people make this argument about the poor cows in cool barns while they are walking from their air conditioned cars to their air conditioned houses.

      Delete
    5. Thanks chiming in with great examples Dairy Mom, Angela, and anonymous.

      Delete
  6. Look. I admire you having a small farm, even though dairy is completely unnecessary. But you literally can NOT say that what happens on your farm is indicative of what happens on extremely large dairy farms. I'm not talking about hearsay, I'm talking about testimonials and video evidence. So go ahead and make your more sustainable and kind type of dairy, but making everyone think that factory farming is A-OK is a joke. Blerg.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. I agree. He obviously has never been to a factory farm.

      Delete
    2. The fact that you both call them "factory farms" shows that u haven't been involved in one either. No one involved in the industry even calls them that. It is a media word. Just because you saw some pictures on a website does not mean that's how large farms actually work. People put fake and staged pictures and videos up of many different things all the time. A person would be naïve if they thought that never happened. So try to do a little fact checking on a non-bias website before thinking your view of a farming operation is right, and the people that live on and around these operations don't know what we are talking about!

      American Ag Supporter

      Delete
    3. http://tvblogs.nationalgeographic.com/2013/07/31/13048/
      is National Geographic Non-Biased enough?

      Delete
    4. Factory farming is real and provides America with the majority of its meat. This is a fact -- there are countless investigations, videos, and eye witness accounts of the inhumane practices behind the concrete walls. It is completely unfounded to argue that the reality of industry standards are exaggerated. What would be the point?

      There is a severe problem with the cruelty in the meat production industry (not everywhere, I admit) and it is fueled purely by greed. I pray that in the near future this kind and sustainable farming practice described above becomes more widespread.

      Delete
  7. Why a cartoon you ask? Because the real thing is too graphic. If you want to accurately speak from the cows point of view, how about you visit a factory farm, where 98% of your meat and dairy comes from. Watch the male calfs be ripped away from their mothers to be killed for veal, watch the cows horns be burned off with no pain killers, watch them get mastitis so severely that they can no longer walk, watch workers kick, whip, and shock them to get them to move, watch their heads get trapped in gates and fences, watch a mother cow be pregnant her all of her short life to produce your milk, watch them eat corn instead of grass, causing ecoli in the gut because corn is cheaper. Maybe you don't have a factory farm and maybe your cows are happy, but most are not, and bottom line: Cows milk is made for baby cows. Humans are not designed to drink it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. First off can you please tell me the name of this "factory farm" so I can do some personal research. Second where did you get the 98% statistic? Was that the amount "factory farms" produce? Thirdly, what do you mean by "factory farm?" Is that how many cows on a farm or the state of ownership of the farm?

      Delete
    2. Amen! These cruel practices are truly common in the meat industry.

      If you want to see a good documentary on these truths, I recommend watching "Earthlings"

      Delete
    3. Male and female calves are removed from their mothers entirely for safety and health reasons. Baby calves have highly undeveloped immune systems, just as human babies, and could easily contract diseases from the bacteria present in the manure of the mothers. Removing them from their mothers eliminates this threat, and also allows for farmers to closely monitor the health and appetites of the calves to make sure they are healthy early in their life. Cows with mastitis are treated as soon as possible because we farmers want our cows to stay healthy, productive, and live long lives. We prioritize their health over anything else, because without our cows, our farm is nonexistent. Their diets are created, perfectly balanced, and constantly improved by special dairy nutritionists that are hired to evaluate each specific farm's cows and feedstuffs (and their nutritive values). As with any industry, there are farmers who need to improve their practices, but I can confidently say that the majority of farmers truly care about their animals and treat them with respect and love, every single day.

      Delete
    4. Thanks for leaving a great detailed answer to their questions! If farmers didn't take good care of their animals there wouldn't be any animals.

      Delete
  8. I can't get over this post. It makes me sad and frustrated and confused. I understand how people are unaware of the cruelty in factory farms, and sometimes I can even understand the people who are aware, but turn away and pretend it doesn't happen. But to just flat out say that there is no problem with factory farming?! That this is just another method for raising animals. That these innocent beings are happy to be tortured and bred for your food?! It is just horrifying. Wake up. Go watch Earthlings. Then update this blog.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are bad seeds in every industry, and just like on the evening news more people will watch the "bad stories" that get all the attention than something good or uplifting that no one pays attention to.

      Lets say you have a restaurant and you have the best food in town. You make your money from the people that come to eat there. You have one employee that is rude beyond belief to your customers until they stop coming. You have to fire them or else go out of business because you have ruined your income source. Or if you, the owner, are rude to your clientele the same will happen. No money equals no business.

      Farms that earn money from their animals must treat them well in order to stay in business. Continual mistreatment of animals by the employees or the owner will lead to decreased productivity from the animal. If you mistreat a dairy cow she goes down in milk. That's the first thing that happens when she is not happy. If you want milk, then you want happy cows. Beef cattle are the same. A sick or mistreated animal is not going to gain weight or get pregnant. Those are facts. It does not matter what size your operation is, you must abide by those facts in the long run because your business will fail otherwise.

      I have been to several large farms. Most recently I went to large dairy that has daily tours. All of the animals there were open to the tour, including milk cows, dry cows, heifers, and calves of all sizes. I don't know how they could perform such atrocities as described while being open to the public as they were.

      We are on two different sides of the issue. You have been convinced by what you have read, heard, or seen. I cannot change your mind with my photos or words on my blog. Thank you for reading my thoughts even if we disagree.

      Delete
    2. Instead of looking at biased websites and videos, go tour a real farm. Then you can make your own conclusions. Also, if humans are not designed to drink milk then why do humans produce lactase, the enzyme that breaks down lactose (the sugar found in milk) during digestion?

      Delete
    3. Ryan, I respect your opinion, and you are a farmer so you obviously know more about these things. I do believe you and many others treat the animals with respect. And I honestly have no idea how Chipotle treats their animals. I have no doubt this video is for profit. I have just seen and heard too much: pictures, videos, testimonials from previous farm workers, etc. And I know it IS all what I choose to believe. But regardless of whether these atrocities go on or not, I know that I do not need meat nor dairy to thrive. I will agree to disagree, because I know I cannot win as a vegan minority in a carnivore world. But I truly respect your opinion and I wish you the best of luck with your farm. Say hi to your cows for me :)

      Delete
    4. Thank you. I definitely will! :)

      Delete
    5. Ryan you seem to just be talking about dairy farms. Given that Chipotle does not serve milk, I would argue that what is happening in the video is meant to portray cows being "pumped" full of unnatural or unnecessary things like hormones, antibiotics, corn products, etc. to improve the amount of meat the cow provides, not milk. Dairy farms have a vested interest in making sure their animals survive and survive well. But meat farms (chicken, cow, pig) do not -- they only need to get "more meat" out of the animal and make it look good (artifical coloring, plumping etc). There is no reason for them to care about how the animal does in life or how happy it is. Please do some research outside of just the dairy industry -- there are serious problems agriculture-industry-wide that are making Americans sick, overweight and in debt.

      Delete
    6. The big Holstein (black and white dairy cow breed) cow statue that contains the Holstein cows inside according to you are not dairy cows and neither does the obvious cow print on the drink in the meal have milk, because Chipotle does not serve milk and these are actually beef cows. To accept that, part of me feels obligated to say "We are at war with Oceania. We have always been at war with Oceania."

      If they spend all this money on a cartoon and still don't know how to depict the beef cow you tell me I'm looking at then how many more inaccuracies are in the video? I would encourage you to read Chipotle’s Scarecrow Part One and Two at http://www.righteousbacon.com/chipotles-scarecrow-part-one-lessons-in-corporate-greed/

      It is a fascinating read on accuracy, fact checking, and ethics as it pertains to the cartoon.

      Meat farmers have to care about their animals health because if they are not healthy they will not grow and in turn they will be weak, sickly, and thin. Angela (a few comments above) made a point about how genetics play a huge factor in how chickens gain weight. Cattle are much the same way. Cattle can be bred for larger size, and some breeds pride themselves on the size, large or small. I choose the animals we breed our cows to and I can select a mate based on potential milk production, position of feet and legs, and other numerous traits. I always consider first the size of the calf at birth and choose a mate that will make it easier for the cow to have. A cow that has an easy pregnancy and calving will be good in the herd. As I have stated before happy cows are productive cows.

      Delete
    7. I agree that many farmers have kind intentions and treat their animals with care. The food production that is backed by greedy corporations, however, is concerned with profit above all else. This does not speak well for the treatment of animals in factory farms.

      I am sure that plenty of larger dairy farms are humane. Could it be possible, however, that the suffering of an animal may not be obvious to people on a large farm tour? It is a fact that most industry dairy cows live a fraction of the length of an ordinary milking cow. And anyway, I'm sure that most large dairy farms do not offer tours.

      Plus I don't hear about many slaughter house guided tours...

      Delete
    8. Ryan, you are wasting your breath. Your audience does not want to believe that they could be in error. Unhappy animals do not produce or grow well, as you say. I have been to many farms, both large and small and while there are some bad ones out there, the majority are not as claimed here. And, yes, I have toured more than one slaughter house and did not find them as depicted by vegetarians, vegans, and PETA. Many of those groups have an agenda. . .

      Delete
    9. If they have already made their mind up before coming here then I have little hope of changing it. I've been replying and giving my opinion in the comments because I think there are many people (like me) who often read blog posts and comments and never comment themselves. Maybe my replies here, and those of other farmers that chimed in, will help some readers to see how this ad campaign by Chipotle is simply misleading. I can't change the world, but maybe as one farmer, I can change a few minds.

      Thanks for sharing your experiences here, too!

      Delete
  9. The food consumed by dairy cattle is not corn it is mostly haylage or silage. Both of these are made from grass because a corn stalk is a type of grass. News flash e coli is everywhere in the environment! Factory farm is a media term, until any one of you that are posting these untrue comments on here visit a large scale farm, you have no room to have an opinion on it. For the previous comment have you actually been to a large scale farm and witnessed any cruelty? If so what kind? As an individual who has put herself through college and has gotten a bachelors in animal science some of these posts really makes me dissapointed in our society and therelack of incentive to edducate themselves instead of believing what somebody else has to say.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=675956246494
      It only takes one video for me to lose faith in the industry. And I have seen waaay too many. Not all from PETA. I don't doubt that there are thousands of hard working farmers who care about their animals. But then I see one of these. And I know that humans do not need meat nor dairy to survive, and all of it becomes pointless and cruel.

      Delete
    2. You link to a bad photo or video and then I could link to a good one. If I did, I would link to my videos, then you would show yours, and... well, where would we be? You are writing because you care about animals and you want them to be treated well. How about I give you two concrete examples where farmers are listening to you.

      The Beef Quality Assurance program is for beef and dairy farmers. It educates farmers on animal handling (important to you!), proper on farm medical care, and many other things. One of the things I learned from it was the proper way to give our cows a shot. The most common reason for us to give shots to our cows, btw is not antibiotics, but rather vaccines. We vaccinate our cows every year. Anyway, there is plenty of data out there to show how this is improving animal care.

      We belong to a dairy cooperative that sells our milk for us. Now the people buying our milk have asked for assurances that the cattle giving the milk are well cared for. Our cooperative in turn has a third party audited program that evaluates each farm on everything from milking routine and cow handling to environmental concerns. If you don't pass then the coop asks you to make improvements until you do. I received word recently that another round of evaluations is eminent. There are other programs out there that evaluate dairies.

      As I have stated earlier, happy animals are productive animals. If you want to be a successful farmer you have to continually ask yourself what can I be doing better.

      Delete
    3. Ryan, your commitment to the treatment of your animals makes happy to hear. I find it hard to believe that your kind practices are the norm, however, considering the record high demand for meat and dairy in the states and the greed of the corporations that have power over large meat production plants.

      Delete
  10. I've worked on, or been to and toured, MANY MANY MANY of these so-called "factory farms" and I can tell you with 100% confidence that these distorted ideas of animals being mistreated or tortured are completely inaccurate. Large farms generally do a better job of taking care of their animals because they have the resources (namely money) to do so. Not only that, but a University of Wisconsin study found that milk quality is actually highest in LARGE farms when compared to medium and small farms. Most large farms (or factory farms if that's the only way you know how to describe them) do an excellent job of raising animals in a very humane and efficient way...and those are the facts from somebody who actually knows from first hand...not from an internet site or a PETA video.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This probably has a lot to do with the fact that larger farms can afford more employees and aren't relying on family for the most part to get everything done every day (feeding, milking, vaccinating, cleaning, taking care of calves, etc.) Our farm (a "factory farm") employees 30 people. We have 3 shifts of milkers, people who feed, people who take care of the sick and pregnant cows, people who take care of calves, etc. etc. etc. We have a herdsman who is watching the employees around the clock - you never know where he is, but he makes sure things are done right. My dh and a couple of others take care of herd health. The very fastest way to get fired on our farm is to mistreat the animals in any way. Comfortable, healthy cows give the best and the most milk. Mistreated cows are stressed cows and their production and milk quality are poor.

      Delete
    2. Thank you both for your comments. I wish more people that have questions would visit large operations themselves for a first hand look and see how much work is involved in animal care.

      Delete
    3. Dairy is one thing, but what about the meat industry?

      Delete
    4. The dairy industry: the regulations, the inspections, the close scrutiny, is *exactly* why we can now detect and prosecute shit like this: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11110961

      Do *not* decry the modernization (and corresponding humanization) of the dairy industry.

      Like most things us humans do, it's two steps forward and a shuffle backward, with the best of us pushing us forward to better beliefs and practices. There is a *lot* to be grateful for in the modern approach to farming, for any criticism you might bring to bear.

      Delete
  11. Excellent response to a disturbing video Ryan.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Congrats to Agent 101 for nailing the Cow's perspective, attitude, and reality! The responses to the comments by Ryan are spot on, also! He shows an amazing amount of common sense. The sad truth about a lot of these 'perspectives' is that some folks would rather 'believe' what they want to believe rather than listen to the truth from responsible animal caretakers who have been taking care of animals almost everyday of their lives!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Appreciate you commenting, Julie! Please do so more often. :)

      Delete
  13. Please educate yourself about America's agriculture industry -- not the local small farms, but rather the one with lobbyists, big corporations, lawsuits, subsidies and billions of dollars behind it -- before writing nonsensical posts like this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! This is the norm these days, unfortunately

      Delete
  14. As disturbing as the factory farming videos are, they do not indicate DAILY life. The piglets getting castrated/tails cut off, is one painful day of their lives. I want to see what daily life is like; not just videos of the days after birth and the moment before slaughter. Show us a representative video. I am only posting as anonymous because I do not have an account, but my cousin in MN who sent me this link (Hi Sherry) is a dairy farmer. I try to see both sides--John

    ReplyDelete
  15. Large farms also give the training to the work force to actually increase the animal husbandry and animal care where as most small "hobby" farms may not be able to give the proper training on medical treatments and animal handling. Large farms are inspected by the USDA frequently on handling techniques as well as facilities.if a farm does not pass inspection they have to change immediately or be shut down. Not all hobby farms have the best handling facilities or technology.

    ReplyDelete
  16. People I work on a 550 cow dairy farm with a creamery right on the farm. The people have access to the dry cows hospital, fresh cows and the other barns. We never have complaints. We are always told by people that they are shocked that our farm doesn't have terrible living conditions and the cows have their own nice clean stalls with plenty of space and not packed in with each other. People who are complaining about farmers remember without us no one else would be able to survive. Next time you put food in your mouth remember that was made for you by the blood sweat and tears of many farmers across America.

    ReplyDelete
  17. People are all different, and we see the world through different eyes. I work on small farms and large dairy farms daily. I'm not saying that the free roam lifestyle wasn't good for animals, but were not in the 20's anymore. People who choose to eat dairy and meat can't just go down to the corner and buy it from Farmer Joe anymore. Government rules and regulations have prevented us from doing that. Can't say I particularly want to hit animals on the road either. Wasn't so bad when you road horses, but its a little hard on the automobiles!

    More and more factory farms exist because we want food fast and cheap. Factory farms can make a profit when income over cost is only 1 cent per animal, a small farm can not pay the bills, so we have fewer family farms every year. With China's lifestyle changes we will become more and more dependent on the factory farms.

    We do need meat, milk, and cheese as well as vegetables and fruits. It is all in a balanced diet. I do not want to change the lifestyle of anyone, please let us choose what we want to eat. What we do not need is all the manmade processed food and fast foods that have become way to common in the American diet.

    Yes, animal cruelty does exist, so do rapist, drug addicts, and children who kill children in schools. Some aspects of society will never go away, they just continue to get worse.

    HSUS will continue until all animals are free to run and bred as nature intended. Dog and cat lovers beware because it is not natural for an animal to spend all day in a house by themselves, sometimes in small cages!

    Different strokes for different folks.

    ReplyDelete
  18. What a great blog post! As an agriculture advocate as well, the Chipotle commercial brings about a lot of frustration. If they would only advertise in a way that would not degrade modern farmers and ranchers that would be much appreciated! I raise beef cattle and sheep and the way that Chipotle attacts the livestock industry within this commercial is a disgrace. If they want to use only naturally fed and grown products, that is their own opinion, which everyone is entitled to. Does Chipotle not realize that if they continue to "slam" modern agriculture then organic and naturally grown food will become really expensive, causing them to have higher costs, and forcing them to sell their food at a higher price. This will more than likely decrease their sales, not increase them! Modern agriculture allows for the demand to be met at a cheaper price, without it, supply will decrease immenseley and therefore price will increase as well. Chipotle needs to take some Econ classes if you ask me.

    ReplyDelete
  19. > Cheese is always a winner!

    I take strong objection to your postmark. Cheese is only a winner because it's so damned delicious. It's hardly a fair comparison. :D

    ReplyDelete
  20. posting as anonymous only because i do not have an account....I am an owner operator of a small Dairy farm in NYS, I agree everyone is entitled to an opinion but i think everyone needs to have a first hand up front account of any situation they wish to argue. whether it be dairy farms, big or small i have been around the dairy industry my whole life, I know how people with an agenda will video and edit video until only some truly outrageous acts are depicted, stop watching videos if you want to argue for or against any topic, visit these farms...any farm worth their salt will let you in to see how they manage their farms, and the ones who wont have probably been burned by these edited and re- edited videos or because of their health practices and biosecurity will not let anyone through their barns...please be real before arguing on topics you really know nothing about...so sad that society has to act so low...

    Carleen M. Wolf hollow Farm NY

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great points. I think the one of the biggest challenges we have is the disconnect between consumers and farmers. The Chipotle video paints the extreme vision that some people have of modern farming.

      Delete
  21. Love this post! I posted it via my social media and my dairy producer friends had very positive comments! My favorite part about this post is when you mention that whether it is one or one hundred cows, they all need the same attention. I have been on a dairy farm of 3000 cows and a feedlot of 98,000 and that is what they care about, their animals wellbeing.
    I look forward to following your blog more! I love hearing from the "udder" side!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's awesome! Thank you, too, for sharing your experience with care on farms. I don't think how much farmers do for the animals that provide for their livelihood can be iterated enough.

      Delete
  22. I think you missed the point. This video wasn't necessarily about big farms it was about big food corps. A lot of times people bash the farmer, and being a farmer myself I find this just as irritating. But what I think Chipotle is trying to get across here is the problems we face as a country with PROCESSING and being more conscious of how our food is handled and contorted to meet the needs of a rapidly growing population. I understand your arguments but think you are aiming it at the wrong target as Chipotle is actually trying to garner support for the farmer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If that was the point of the video then I think Chipotle failed in their attempt to get that message across. After reading Dairy Carrie's post on how they deal with their farmer suppliers http://dairycarrie.com/2013/09/24/chipotlevideo/ I think, as Luke told Darth Vadar, "there's still good in you, I can feel it." However, that is not what they chose to talk about in the video as well made as it was. Why not show pride in those beliefs and joy, instead of fear, umm which leads to the dark side?

      Delete